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MOVIE REVIEW
We Were Soldiers

GENE

 SNICK

 GORDY

Gene the Barber

Snick the Sidekick

Gordie the Barber

WE WERE SOLDIERS

 

 

This is a non-political true story of the 7th Cavalry's first Vietnam ground battle in 1965, only to be outnumbered ten to one, killing 2,000 North Vietnamese troops.
The film shows basic guts and heroism rather than a complicated story with a message. This is not Mel Gibson's flashiest role, but I think it's his best since Braveheart.

Combat films are coming fast and furious these days, but We Were Soldiers is well worth a look.

We Were Soldiers captures the Vietnam War perfectly: you can't figure out why you're there and it seems like it will never end.

This heavy-handed, fact-based gorefest does little justice to either the war or its source material, the bestseller by Lt. General Moore.

Is there a moral? Sure, war is hell, and so is sitting through pointless, flat films like this.

We Were Soldiers is the true story of the first major land battle in the Vietnam War in 1965.

It's also one of the best war movies in a long time. The film was excellent at presenting the fierceness of battle and the way it depicts the emotional and psychological experience of war.

This is one of the most savage and brutal battles of the Vietnam War, where about 450 American troopers were taken by helicopters to engage Viet Cong forces.

This became a 3-day siege and ambush. About 2,000 enemy troops surrounded the American soldiers in what was called "the valley of death."

The results of the combat were 234 GIs killed with 1,800 Viet Cong causalities. The picture emphasizes the bravery of the soldiers on both sides.


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Contents copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 by the Barbershop Movie Review:
Gene Allen, Gordy Allen. and Snick Farkas.
Page created by Esther Trosow and design copyright 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002.
Last updated March 4, 2002.